10
Mon, Dec
53 New Articles

National
Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

It was Myles Munroe who said that “there are four types of people in the world”, those who watch things happen; those who let things happens; and those who ask what just happened, and those who make things happen. Martin Luther King Jnr. Corroborated this assertion when he stated “there are those who write history; there are those who make history;

It was Myles Munroe who said that “there are four types of people in the world”, those who watch things happen; those who let things happens; and those who ask what just happened, and those who make things happen. Martin Luther King Jnr. Corroborated this assertion when he stated “there are those who write history; there are those who make history;

there are those who experience history. These allusions point to the different classes of people we have in our society today. Thus, some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them by either by fate or circumstance.
The exploits of Dr. Nnamdi Eugene Nwauwa in the field of medicine, especially in the area of Emergency Medical Response Services (EMRS) placed him in the class of those who achieved greatness in his chosen career by dent of hardwork and his selfless service to God and humanity made things happened and thus qualified him in the league of men who made history.
Dr. Nnamdi Nwauwa may not be known in Nigeria to many people but his exploits and contributions in the field of EMRS earned him international recognition and worldwide acclamation and brought honour to Nigeria.
Born 64 years ago at Ndiulokwu, Izombe in Oguta LGA of Imo State, Dr. Nwauwa started his primary education at St. Faith School Awka, Anambra State, from where he gained admission into the famous Dennis Memorial Grammar School (DMGS) Onitsha. The quest for further education took him to the university of Lagos, Nigeria, where he studied medicine. He graduated in 1980 with a Bachelor in Medicine and Bachelor in Surgery (MBBS). He had his Masters from the same University in 1988 with specialization in Public Health. He was certified a critical care emergency transport physician at the university of Maryland, USA. In 2010 and Certified EMT specialist at the TEEX A&M University, Texas in the same year. Also, he had another master in emergency medicine from the university of Nicaragua, South America in 2015 and certified a fellowship of international emergency medical at the Harvard University Teaching Hospital in 2017. The acquisition of these degrees, in addition to professional courses and certificates marked the beginning of a blistering career in the field of Emergency Medicine Service EMS in Nigeria.
Concerned with dearth of professionally trained EMS practitioners in the country, Dr.  Nwauwa preoccupied himself with the task of developing an efficient EMS system in the country and today his efforts have yielded dividends as Nigeria can boast of trained emergency responders. Hitherto Nigeria with a population of approximately 180 million people had nothing or less than one hundred professionally trained emergency medical responders. This was largely due to the fact that the country does not have a natural EMS training standards. And with this staggering shortfall coupled with the soaring traffic fatalities on our roads and other extremist activities of insurgents and other hoodlums, the number of lives lost on daily basis is unimaginable. This state of affairs preoccupied the attention of the university of Lagos trained Medical Director of Industrial Medical Services and for 35 years, he made addressing this grave problems his life's priority. As an ED doctor, EMS Educator and Public Advocate, he remained the foremost physician pushing for the adoption of an emergency medical system large enough to address the problems ailing Nigeria.
Unfortunately the Nigeria medical system wasn't structured to handle catastrophic caseload, especially in the rural areas. To Dr. Nnamdi Nwauwa, something urgent has to be done and the development of a prehospital intervention mechanism is the panacea. With little or no funding from the government he as determined to set up an efficient EMS system in Nigeria. 1985 an American oil company operating in Nigeria approached him to develop an ambulatory service and field clinics for their large operations. That marked the birth of Industrial Medical Service which eventually proved to be the seed of an expansive EMS organization that would encapsulate the many branches of his practice scope. The experience gave him his first exposure to a formalized EMS organization and inspired him to act further for underserved Nigerians without hope of urgent medical assistance. This initial success propelled him to a radically reoriented training towards EMS in Nigeria and as he observed. “I developed so much flare for EMS and in 1992, I organize the first CPR training in the country, in Lagos and it was attended by healthcare providers from all over the country”.
Determined to improve his knowledge and training in EMS, with his personal resources, Dr. Nwauwa travelled abroad to receive certification to conduct training in CPR, BLS, Pediatric ALS, American Heart Association (AHA) Heartsavers programmes and other life saving techniques and “this new knowledge enhanced my skills, knowledge and confidence in prehospital training and services and 'I immediately took the campaign to all corners of the country-local, state and federal government' he said”. By the year 2002, he had become a household name in EMS and was sought after by state governments and private companies with large operations in Nigeria to establish EMS for them. Thus, Industrial Medical Services evolved into Emergency Response Services Group (ERSG) which sought to change the prehospital healthcare environment in Nigeria in a number of ways.
Dr. Nwauwa estimated that Nigeria experiences over 50.000 traffic fatalities each year, especially with the high rate of crime and Boko Haram insurgency. And realizing the dearth of professionally trained EMS physicians and the transportation difficulties the average Nigerians faces, he accepted that the most pragmatic approach was  to train citizens on how to act when no healthcare workers was around. To this end, he set his sight on dispersing basic first aid, CPR and first response training to citizens throughout the country. By teaching lay people basic resuscitation techniques, he hoped to make bystanders a key aspect of battering Nigeria's healthcare system.
His vision also goes beyond training rural Nigerians. He wanted CPR training embedded into public and private systems throughout the country.
He was in the frontfront to make CPR and basic EMT training mandatory for all NGO health staff and contracting firms. In partnership with the Federal Ministry of Health, he was able to use advocacy, media promotion and free training to “explode the concept of resuscitation in Nigeria”. This free training programme was anchored by Emergency Response International. Later joined by the Advanced Life Supporters Association of Nigeria (ALS) and the society of Emergency Medicine Practitioners of Nigeria (SEMP) and Dr. Nwauwa served as the National Chairman of these organizations.
Perhaps one of Dr. Nwauwa's biggest breakthroughs in spreading CPR came by partnering with the Nigeria Nursing and Midwifery Council, the regulatory body for Nigeria Nurses, which allowed more than 300,000 Nurses in Nigeria to be certified in CPR. His initiatives in EMS have taken Nigeria to another level. Today Emergency Medical Response Service  Group, a group of medical, nursing and paramedics consultants, supported by Administrators and Staff Consultants champion the knowledge and skills of emergency response and disaster management in Nigeria.
The efforts of Dr. Nwauwa towards advanced medical practice in Nigeria, especially in EMS, attracted the attention of the federal government and international organizations. In 2013 the federal government set up a ministerial committee to prepare the curriculum for the establishment of paramedic schools in Nigeria and two of the institutions have been granted approval. In March 2016, the Journal of Emergency Medical Services, JEMS, a medical tabloid based in San Diego, California, USA honoured ten innovators in the field of EMS. Out of those ten Honorees, Dr. Nwauwa was the only African and the first Nigerian to be accorded such an honour.
The astute and God fearing Imo State born physician was recognized for leading advocacy efforts and developing educational systems to establish a stable, functioning EMS system in Nigeria. This erudite, unassuming, quintessential Medical Practitioner is today called the Father of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Nigeria.
Until his death last July, Dr. Nnamdi Nwauwa was the Chairman of Advanced Trauma Life Support of American College of Surgeons. He was the first International Training Center Coordinator of the American Heart Association and Emergency Cardiovascular care programs in Nigeria; National Chairman, Advanced Life Support Providers Association of Nigeria (ALSPAN); National Chairman, Society of Emergency Medicine Practitioners of Nigeria (SEMPON), a member and fellow of over thirty Medical Professional Bodies locally and Internationally.
Dr. Nwauwa was not only a Medical Practitioner but a devout Christian with passion for spreading the gospel. His treaties on “ill-gotten wealth” and “After All These What Next” are a must read for all Christians. A good family man too, whose humanity, simplicity, generosity, compassion and integrity is unparalleled. He will be mixed by all humanity.
  

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS
Sign up via our free email subscription service to receive notifications when new information is available.