23
Tue, Oct
90 New Articles

Opinion

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

It is important to begin this analysis by stressing one fact. That is to say, “the origin of propaganda is the Christian church.”
I firmly stand to be discountered successfully on this postulation. What I mean is that it is the early Christians proponents of the Christian faith that began the application of propaganda as a tool for the numerous and difficult job of indoctrination of people to be converted to the Christian faith. Anybody who wants to know the truth must dig deep into ancient history to know this fact.

It is important to begin this analysis by stressing one fact. That is to say, “the origin of propaganda is the Christian church.”
I firmly stand to be discountered successfully on this postulation. What I mean is that it is the early Christians proponents of the Christian faith that began the application of propaganda as a tool for the numerous and difficult job of indoctrination of people to be converted to the Christian faith. Anybody who wants to know the truth must dig deep into ancient history to know this fact.


My Christian faith is never and cannot be called to question. I am and will always remain a Christian throughout my life. I may hold some divergent views on some issues concerning Christianity which I am entitled to do as an individual. But that does not mean that I am not a Christian, never and never ever. After all, it is impossible for the     Bishop of Rome to become a Muslim. Impossible.
I recall that in 1995, I was invited as a guest speaker in Nairobi at the annual General meeting of the then Federation of African Public Relations. My topic was “The challenge of African culture in a dominant Christian African.” By the special grace of God, I struggled to do my best to put the issue in its true perspectives to the effect that “what Christian has done in African since its emergence was trying to undermine the people's culture and tradition by dabbing them, “fetish or paganism.” 
After taking my audience through the maze of differences in the understanding of different African cultures and the need to make a clear cut distinction between the old African paganism and modern Christianity, I concluded, “without doubt, many African cultures were embedded on the culture and tradition of the peoples. However, having embraced on the Christian religion, the various peoples of Africa have tried to remove from the their cultural practices those elements which run counter to their beliefs as Christians such as offering of fowls and animals at idol shrines or hunting naked in the bush or run catching rabbits life to demonstrate that one has attained maturity.” I made it clear that, “I abhor the efforts of some Christian who ignorantly or deliberately trying to dab every African culture as “fetish or paganism.” That is not acceptable to me.
After the lecture session, a member of the audience, a top Clergy from Uganda in his remarks said this, “Dr. Osuji, after listening to you at one point I attempt to think that you an atheist but could not sustain that because to all intents and purposes you are indeed a Christian. But I must say this, “Indeed you are a free thinker.”
Honestly that was what put Martin Luther and his colleagues in trouble when they bodily attempted to question some practices in the early Catholic Church, requesting for some reviews and reformations. They were misunderstood by the Catholic Leadership, excommunicated and driven to a course they never interned which snowballed into the emergence of the few Protestant Churches in fifteen century. Even until today that attitude exists somehow because if one attempts to express one's opinion on certain issues, one is seen as either this or that. This is wrong. I remember what one author once asked, “In a democracy can we ask questions about our Christian faith.”
The point that I am making here is that people must not see our culture and tradition as against Christian religion. Absolutely no. no Christian will “dance naked in a market place to assert his belief in his culture. Never.
For example if there was an old cultural practices of dancing round the market square for certain culture whether half naked or not, today, such practice has been reformed and people dance or celebrate in full cultural attire or even with western suit or even caftan dresses.
It is wrong for some Christian or some evangelicals to see this as idol worshipping. This is monumental ignorance or one may say, “Giving a dog bad name in order to hang her.”
During the last Christmas, different towns and villages in spite of economic hard time celebrated the Christmas by displaying their different cultural practices in order to sustain their culture and tradition.
Whether it was the display of masquerades, dancing of okorosho, ekpe, atulegwe, ulaga, ekpo, etc, it is wrong to  dab these as pagan worshipping by those “who know God more than Christ.”
Of course what they are doing is to protect their territory and to avoid any type of incursion. In fact, it is not necessarily that they are against those cultural practices and displays because nothing fishes or pagan is attached to them. They are only trying to defend their zones of “economic and social comfort.” No more no less. Christmas must continue to offer the people the opportunity to display their cultures and traditions and many more are encouraged to resuscitate their lost cultural glories. In a way, we must continue to give to God what belongs to him and to Caesar what belongs to him. Culture is the people's way of life and does not mean anti Christianity. Not at all. And those who see it that way are both myopic and ignorant of indeed what Christianity and culture are. They need “deliverance.”


BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS
Sign up via our free email subscription service to receive notifications when new information is available.