25
Mon, Jun
81 New Articles

Opinion

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

One of the principal reasons why advocates for the growth and sustenance of Igbo Language and culture persists is the fact that the Igbo nation has inexhaustible behaviours and conducts which guide the Igbo person. It is therefore important that generation after generation must embrace and understands these so many forms, beliefs, culture and tradition which are by and large what makes the Igbo man a unique person as a being.

One of the principal reasons why advocates for the growth and sustenance of Igbo Language and culture persists is the fact that the Igbo nation has inexhaustible behaviours and conducts which guide the Igbo person. It is therefore important that generation after generation must embrace and understands these so many forms, beliefs, culture and tradition which are by and large what makes the Igbo man a unique person as a being.


The Igbo race has a lot of fundamental beliefs and practices which until today, the average Igbo person has not deviated from them no matter the level of his education, the depth of his wealth or the expansion of his greatness. These things have remained centrally those things which guide people in their relationship with their fellow Igbo man.
For example, truth, trust, agreement and undertaking which a person undertakes with a fellow Igbo man must be seen to remain sacrosanct.
When time was time, any Igbo person that steals even a tuber of yam from a farm was usually disgraced and paraded around the market square. In fact, such a person was paraded naked and the tuber of yam which he stole was usually hung around his neck. Even if it was a fowl that he stole and caught, he was administered the same measure of punishment. In many Igbo cultures, he was ostracized for days, months or years depending on the people's own custom.
Then and only then, telling lies was a serious abomination, not to talk of stealing, raping or other minor or major crimes. Again then and only then, people kept agreements entered between others. People borrowed money and repaid such loans. People gave fellow citizens things of value such as money, gun, gold and other highly valuable things for safe – keeping. And when required, such was returned without any problem.
In fact, when serious agreements or teaching behaviours ensued, the Igbo man would resort to the invocation of Ofor na Ogu. Ofor na Ogu was a biding covenant between people which if one was cheated or robbed of his belonging or suffer any act of dishonesty, he resorted to the invocation of the prayer of Ofor na Ogu.
Properly put, Ogu is the pleading of innocence which must precede Ofor. For example, if a master enters into agreement with his servant to train him to become a trader, a tailor, a mechanic or any other trade, promising that at the end of the training, he would help his servant to establish his own trade or business with part of the money or provision of some equipments to enable the servant begin successfully on his own. But if in the end, the master fabricates baseless accusations against his servant to justify his not willing to fulfill the agreement, the servant or his father will invoke Ofor na Ogu.
Today as it has always been, the servant would invoke the concept of Ofor na Ogu which could be exercised by his father or elder in the family.
The servant must first of all plead innocence of stealing the master's money or diverting his goods. His pleading of innocence must be very accurate and straightforward with undiluted conscience. As he states his innocence the person who would effect the affirmation of the Ofor would listen very carefully and attentively. Conversely, the servant would say, “If I did steal his money or divert his goods or cheat him in any way, whatever course I place on his head would come to nothing. But if what I have stated is correct, then my pleading would be followed by the knocking of the Ofor on the ground as a seal of authority with the chorus “Isee or Iha or ofor ree” or as the case may be. Ofor - a short staff made of Ogorishi, bitter leaf, kola tree or tender palm- frond tied together or any other substance prepared as Ofor for that purpose. The curse would be unambiguous to the effect that if “I did not do him any of those things stated and he treated me like this, the gods of our ancestors must pursue him and pursue his business; he would see no more progress; anywhere he puts his hands for business, failure and failure would be his regular portion.” Then the Ofor will be hit on the ground gently with the local chorus of “Iha” or “Ka ofor ree” or “Isee.”
Then a person so cursed if guilty is certainly in trouble. It may not be instant or immediately, but “the concept of natural justice which has originated from the Good Lord will intervene. Of course, many Igbo scholars including those of them who are Christians must tend to believe in the efficacy of “Ofor na Ogu.”
Now that politics has begun to take centre stage in our society today, those who have made political commitment must search their minds and try to fulfill the agreement in terms of promises of supporting, helping or working for a particular candidate to see that a person is nominated and helps him or her to win. If he tries and fails, the invocation of Ofor na ogu would not hold him. But if he deliberately and purposefully tries to overlook such promises or commitments, according to Igbo religion, he is likely to face difficulties in life.
For those who freely take oath of offices but have deliberately jettisoned such agreements or commitments, may stop for one moment and reflect how their lives have been since they took false oath to cheat, deceive and short-change the society. Unfortunately, sometimes they take things for granted and may not know the origin of sudden catastrophes which have lately began to befall on them or their families. Tomorrow they engage half-baked pastors in hovels and make shit huts to “cast curses No 1, 2, 3, to perhaps fifty. My brothers, it does not work. According to the Bible; whatever measure you used to measure a fellow man will be used unto you. (matt 7:2).
According to law of distributive justice, “What goes around must come around.” According to Simon Hunt, a spiritualist, “Anything you do a fellow human which causes him pain, must return to you for the same measure of pain.”
Politicians, please check your conscience! Because, process to acquire power according to Kent Fisher, is very tempting and it is fraught with criminal and violent behaviours.”
They must be very careful. As a king, if you promise your son as your heir, never you jettison that promise under any circumstances. Because, with the father's promise, the son has begun to build hope and faith on his father's promise. Of all human activities, politics is the only one full of intrigues, deceit, falsehood, dishonesty and above all myriad of deceptive tendencies. Only men of solid characters and integrity can withstand such jingoistic propensities.

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS
Sign up via our free email subscription service to receive notifications when new information is available.